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widower2

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We've hit on such things in various other threads in the course of general discussion, so I thought it might (repeat might) be a good idea to focus that stuff in one thread for such things, where if one wanted they could try to take a break from the anguish of loss and try to focus on something that while trivial in the extreme, might be good that way, to focus on something else for awhile...(I tried starting a few up in the "Chit Chat" section of the site, but few seem to find it). So:

Food. We had some BBQ talk awhile ago and I'm starving for some good BBQ. Sadly, there are none in my area. Can anyone in eastern or western NC or Memphis air mail me some??? 

 

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Rey Dominguez Jr

Food: sorry, I am not up on good BBQ in Sandy Eggo.  With all the Mexican food places in and around SD, I prefer Hawaiian or Pacific Islander food.  Veronica and I, lately with our younger son, had become acquainted with Japanese noodle restaurants, ramen and udon noddles in a bowl of steaming broth.  Several of those around here, along with middle Eastern.  But a good burger always goes down good, with cheddar cheese and bacon added.  Veronica preferred turkey  burgers.

A couple of years ago, our older son took us out to a steak house for Mother’s Day.  Good steaks but he sprang for a treat: a 6 ounce serving of Wagyu beef.  That 6 ounces of beef was pretty pricey but was practically a once in a lifetime taste for us at $99 for the serving.  We all shared a sliver.   It was like tasting beef-flavored butter, it melted in your mouth.  

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Talked to NOAA yesterday as their predictions 15 degrees off, how it's gone this fall/winter.  They underpredict the cold, which changes snow level and amounts, so hard to prepare, no one else predicts for my area. They tried to tell me it's off a satelite 1,000 above me, um, no, if that were the case the amount would be even worse!  They're idiots.  Thinking the webmaster knows nothing about climate.  Probably sits behind a desk all day, doesn't look outside.  So I guess I'm in the dark with weather predictions.

Went to the dentist, took Kodie, he was an angel and everyone loved him.  Although he showed concern when they worked on me, I think he was worried what they were doing to me, I had to assure him I was okay.  Four years no cavities, love Keto! That was never the case before. Got groceries, came home, late dinner, slept seven hours straight, I never do that!  

3 hours ago, Rey Dominguez Jr said:

practically a once in a lifetime taste for us at $99 for the serving.  We all shared a sliver.

Wow!  That IS pricey!  Glad you have that memory though.

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3 hours ago, Rey Dominguez Jr said:

With all the Mexican food places in and around SD, I prefer Hawaiian or Pacific Islander food.

... but, what IS Hawaiian or Pacific Islander food?  seems like it must be ... fish??  or like we had when I was a kid, spam cut up and fried with bits of onion, green pepper, and PINEAPPLE.  and some kind of sauce my mom made.   So that made it "Hawaiian," at least a-way back then.   :)

Me, I've been inspired by Thanksgiving to start making pies (and pie crust) again.  I do try to use about half sugar and make up the rest of the sweetness in the filling with stevia powder ... and it's hard to get the right amount of stevia powder, but it mostly works fine.  I actually peeled 7 Granny Smith apples, and cored them, it's been so long I'd forgotten that whole procedure.

Widower2, it's been so long since I've had good barbecue!  I'd think with you grilling so much you'd barbecue the heck outta any meat.  hunh, barbecue turkey roll???

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Just had Hawaiian food last night from a local place called Mo Mettahs.  Their food is like a Hawaiian BBQ.  Pulled pork, grilled chicken macaroni salad (amazing! and I really dislike macaroni salad) rice….you can look up the menu online and see what it looks like.  Pokè is another Hawaiian food and the best place for that is the Pokè Parlor in Southern California.  I just can’t replicate it at home.  Ahi tuna, rice or lettuce, avocado, pineapple, edamame, shrimp, crab, veggies of your choice, wasabi, ponzu… really it was a design your own “bowl” a mix of Asian and Hawaiian flavors.   So fresh and so delicious! 

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11 hours ago, widower2 said:

Sadly, there are none in my area. Can anyone in eastern or western NC or Memphis air mail me some???

I wish I could help you there. I am chuckling a bit though because this reminds me of an episode of MASH when Hawkeye is craving his favorite BBQ from a place called Adam’s Ribs. When he finally manages to finagle an order for delivery to Korea, he hangs up the phone and then says something like, “Damn! I forgot to order coleslaw.”

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7 hours ago, Boggled said:

Widower2, it's been so long since I've had good barbecue!  I'd think with you grilling so much you'd barbecue the heck outta any meat.  hunh, barbecue turkey roll???

Well when I say "BBQ," I mean pulled pork (or beef, if one must) like this: BBQ   Not "anything cooked on a grill," although many people call that "BBQing." Also different than saying something like "BBQ chicken," which to me is chicken with BBQ sauce, which might or might not be cooked on a grill. 

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3 hours ago, foreverhis said:

I wish I could help you there. I am chuckling a bit though because this reminds me of an episode of MASH when Hawkeye is craving his favorite BBQ from a place called Adam’s Ribs. When he finally manages to finagle an order for delivery to Korea, he hangs up the phone and then says something like, “Damn! I forgot to order coleslaw.”

lol, I remember that episode. That's how I feel right now about good BBQ! 

Speaking of Thai, there's a good Thai place near work but I only go in about once a week. I keep thinking I'll order Thai for takeout for dinner and keep forgetting! :mad:

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My husband was a terrific cook. He enjoyed making cajun dishes, such as jambalaya, gumbo, crawfish etouffee or red beans and rice.   He often made oyster dressing at Thanksgiving.  But one dish he would make during our brief cold spells, like the 2 days we just had, was oyster artichoke soup.  That soup was so creamy and delicious and would warm you up with both temperature and spice. 

He actually won a couple of cooking competitions with that recipe. 

I guess I need to plan a trip to New Orleans to indulge those cravings. 

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Great, now I want cajun!

I went to a business trip to Shreveport, LA and had my one real foray into cajun food...turtle soup for an appetizer, alligator as the main course. Another day I had of course crawfish. Good stuff

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I've never had turtle or alligator, but that sounds like the area you'd get it!  I did help my dad catch and fix crawfish when young.

11 hours ago, Gail 8588 said:

He often made oyster dressing at Thanksgiving. 

My mom made this, I think I was the only one in the family that liked it.  Your husband sounds like quite a cook!

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I met some fellas in Kentucky at a roadside bbq shack and we drank beer and ate, we all enjoyed; but those guys were angry it was called bbq. In their opinion there was only one kind and that wasn't it.

I on the other hand will eat it all and I don't care what you call it as long as I get some.

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for BBQ pulled pork, easy way to do it is in a crockpot, if you have one;  I'm not sure about the new pressure-cooking "Instant Pots," but probably they also have a "slow-cooker" program built in.  The long slow cooking in your preferred sauce infuses the flavor into the pork.  But you do have to pull the meat apart with a fork at some point.

crockpot pulled pork bbq - Search (bing.com)

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Boggled, that's how I do mine!  And it's good!  I've also done the same with chicken.  Freeze in packets, wonderful to pull out and use when you live alone.

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Rey Dominguez Jr
17 hours ago, Boggled said:

for BBQ pulled pork, easy way to do it is in a crockpot, if you have one

Kalua pork is pretty much the same.  Pork shoulder, liquid smoke, sea salt, and a crock pot.  Shred with a fork and get rid of the bone.  Recipes easy to find on-line.  

Veronica really liked a Hawaiian Pumpkin Crunch Cake that I found a recipe for on-line.  She was a fan of pumpkin pie and I told her let’s try this.  She was a convert.  https://www.hawaiimagazine.com/how-to-make-hawaii-style-pumpkin-crunch-a-local-moms-recipe/

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I'm not much of a cook, but a boston butt pork roast is about as easy to cook as you can get.

You rub any favorite spice  mix you like on the meat, or just use salt and pepper. Wrap it in aluminum foil crimping the foil closed. Wrap it in aluminum foil again.  Set it in a rectangular pan and put it in the oven at 260 degrees. Go to work. Come home 8 hours later.  Take the roast out of the oven but don't open it for 30 to 40 minutes.  It needs to rest for a bit.

Then open it up and slice it or shred it, it will fall apart easily. 

My sons would cook this after they went off to college and their friends were always amazed at their pork sliders. 

 

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I'm making this right now (forgot the cinnamon but can add it to each slice as I eat it):

Smells good in the oven!
image.png.2d70dda4dc08edf6a2ec8189dfb1e1c9.png

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Went to a cheese tasting at an upscale market nearby.  I had a nice time trying the different samples and pairings.  This particular store has a cooking school  with several professional chefs so the samples were quite delicious!  I bought a few obscure cheeses, chutneys, spreads…I also picked up a nice baguette and had it sliced for some flavored olive oils and balsamics I have at home.  Sometimes I really like to eat charcuterie style especially this time of year.  Makes it easy since it’s just me!

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Nice!

This time of year I buy myself a box of (sugar free) chocolates...I never buy this kind of this otherwise so it's a holiday kind of thing. Of course I throw away the coconut. :) 

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Here's a topic: favorite three comfort foods? (Note: to me that is not "favorite three foods"...it's a little different)

Mine: 

- Pot pies
- Cookies (almost any kind without coconut, but choc chip and oatmeal are favs)
- Chicken fried rice 

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Rey Dominguez Jr

- Snickerdoodle cookies

- Pancit and lumpia (Filipino food)

- Tacos

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4 hours ago, Roxeanne said:

Spaghetti al pesto

Panettone classico

Un calice di prosecco

 

Roxanne, I love spaghetti al pesto. In fact I make my own pesto from scratch. I've tried different store bought pestos and the best I've found is from Costco. Nothing like real pesto from Genoa though. And panettone classico, another favourite during holidays.

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Homemade cinnamon rolls with walnuts and raisins

Refried beans made into dip 

Pistachio nuts

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57 minutes ago, Roxeanne said:

And you love prosecco ? Cin cin🥂🍾

I do! I was in an Italian family for 23 years, still love the food!

7 minutes ago, Boggled said:

Homemade cinnamon rolls with walnuts and raisins

Refried beans made into dip 

Pistachio nuts

Can't have the beans but have a recipe for Keto copycat cinnamon rolls!😋

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Making coffee FOR ONE.   Drinking coffee first thing in the morning out on the swing on the back deck, looking at the world, used to be a big normal for Steve and me.  After he died I've kept on making the same amount (for two), so end up drinking it for two (or three) days.  Then in the midst of grief I just started making a full 12-cup pot in our Mr. Coffee and just drinking it in the morning and various times during the day, until it was gone.  It was EASY.  But by the last day it was ... well, not good, pure and simple.   A coffee-afficionado would say "horrible!"  well, yeah.

So I've been looking for a 3 cup coffee maker that would just last me for one day.   Ended up being boggled again, by allthekinds of coffee makers, and just thought to myself, "just make enough coffee for one day in "our" present (simple basic, Mr. Coffee) coffee pot.  Which I've been doing for the past couple of days.  Big improvement in coffee taste! ...   We have a grinder, so a few beans ground, added to pre-ground coffee, is also an improvement.

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I make enough for four cups in my 12 cup coffee maker, use 2 parts Pleasant Hill Farms, 2 parts Hazelnut, 1 part Rocket Java, also grind the beans.  So good, esp. with my well water!  I make my own blend of creamer, Heavy whipping cream, varied flavors, 1 tsp sweetener for 32 oz creamer.  Use 1 Tbsp per cup.  The reason I make this is because the SF creamer they sell in the store is horrible for you.

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2 hours ago, KayC said:

I make enough for four cups in my 12 cup coffee maker, use 2 parts Pleasant Hill Farms, 2 parts Hazelnut, 1 part Rocket Java, also grind the beans.  So good, esp. with my well water!  I make my own blend of creamer, Heavy whipping cream, varied flavors, 1 tsp sweetener for 32 oz creamer.  Use 1 Tbsp per cup.  The reason I make this is because the SF creamer they sell in the store is horrible for you.

Yep.  I'm finding our 12 cup coffee maker still works fine for only one person.  I looked up Rocket Java, never heard of it OR Pleasant Hill Farms ... but you're in the Land of Coffee, KayC!   I just use heavy whipping cream, but when our local store doesn't have ANY (which happens all too often!), Half & Half just has to do.  I agree about commercial "creamers" too.  what's it they say ... "trans fats."  I think.  bad bad bad I THINK.     Your coffee blend sounds interesting.  I like both dark roast and this kind of "German Mild" from Aldi's:  Aldi German Roasted Coffee - AldiThings.  ... oh yeah, I sweeten with NOW Better Stevia powder ... 1/8 tsp for about 10 oz. of coffee.

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13 hours ago, Sparky1 said:

Roxanne, I love spaghetti al pesto. In fact I make my own pesto from scratch. I've tried different store bought pestos and the best I've found is from Costco. Nothing like real pesto from Genoa though. And panettone classico, another favourite during holidays.

I too love spaghetti al pesto.  I'm very picky about it, so almost no store-bought will ever do it for me.  I can make my own no problem, but I've found one local Italian restaurant run by an actual Italian family.  The current chef-owner is third generation.  His pesto is just perfect.  I will also order his pesto alfredo, which is soooo good.  Everything is made onsite and from scratch.  They buy from our local farmers markets whenever possible.  During our extended basil season, the sauces are at their best.  It's a rare treat (calories, fat, and carbs aren't exactly low) and I almost always do takeout.  Bless his heart, he includes a separate extra container of sauce for me (plain pesto or pesto alfredo).  He serves generous, though not outrageously large, portions, so I always have leftover for the next day.  I'll gently heat up everything, poor on extra sauce, and basically swoon at the first bite.

I will check out the Costco pesto.  I'm a purist, even though I know that technically any no-cook, pureed herb sauce is considered pesto.  I want the  Genovese classic, so it must have olive oil, parmesan, garlic, salt, and pine nuts, not some other nut, even though I know they're expensive.  No weird additional ingredients, no diluting the purity of the basic pesto.  I'm willing to pay for the treat of it.

Boy, good thing I just had a late breakfast/early lunch after my morning Sunday Zoom yoga class.  If I hadn't, I'd be out in the freezer right now trying to find the little container from a company that makes traditional pesto, but that I can only find in the Bay Area.  I always buy a container to take home and freeze when I go up to visit.  It's not quite the same as having it fresh, of course, but it freezes well and is darn good.

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6 hours ago, Roxeanne said:

And you love prosecco ? Cin cin🥂🍾

Of course I love Prosecco, cin cin 😁

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37 minutes ago, foreverhis said:

I too love spaghetti al pesto.  I'm very picky about it, so almost no store-bought will ever do it for me.  I can make my own no problem, but I've found one local Italian restaurant run by an actual Italian family.  The current chef-owner is third generation.  His pesto is just perfect.  I will also order his pesto alfredo, which is soooo good.  Everything is made onsite and from scratch.  They buy from our local farmers markets whenever possible.  During our extended basil season, the sauces are at their best.  It's a rare treat (calories, fat, and carbs aren't exactly low) and I almost always do takeout.  Bless his heart, he includes a separate extra container of sauce for me (plain pesto or pesto alfredo).  He serves generous, though not outrageously large portions, so I always have leftover for the next day.  I'll gently heat up everything, poor on extra sauce, and basically swoon at the first bite.

I will check out the Costco pesto.  I'm a purist, even though I know that technically any no-cook, pureed herb sauce is considered pesto.  I want the  Genovese classic, so it must have olive oil, parmesan, garlic, salt, and pine nuts, not some other nut, even though I know they're expensive.  No weird additional ingredients, no diluting the purity of the basic pesto.  I'm willing to pay for the treat of it.

Boy, good thing I just had a late breakfast/early lunch after my morning Sunday Zoom yoga class.  If I hadn't, I'd be out in the freezer right now trying to find the little container from a company that makes traditional pesto, but that I can only find in the Bay Area.  I always buy a container to take home and freeze when I go up to visit.  It's not quite the same as having it fresh, of course, but it freezes well and is darn good.

No Parmesan cheese, that is fake.  Better than nothing though. Hard to get in a jar of pesto but it has to be Parmigiano Reggiano or Grana Padano cheese. Those are the real cheeses made in Italy, they're not cheap though. The other ingredients you mentioned are right. Pine nuts are very expensive and sometimes I use Walnuts. I make a big batch and freeze it in cubes, and then wrap them in foil and freeze them again.

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2 hours ago, Roxeanne said:

Thanks Roxeanne.  The true way to make it, but some don't add the Pecorino cheese. The Pecorino cheese gives it a kick because it is a strong tasting cheese.  Just a little bit of it is needed. Nothing wrong with it, I like to taste the cheese since the Parmigiano is a 'sweeter' cheese. I put lots of garlic though, really kicks it up.

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6 hours ago, Sparky1 said:

Parmigiano Reggiano or Grana Padano

Absolutely!  I should have been specific.  I don't mean that weird, chalky "parmesan" cheese.  I mean the real deal or nothing.  Grana Padano is friendlier to my budget and quite delicious.  I like a small amount of Pecorino sometimes, but Reggiano is my preferred option.  I'm no longer up to using a mortar and pestle, though I did back in my younger years, so I use the food processor on pulse, gently.

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Slightly diff topic...wine. Any fans? Any particular type you like or not? I tend to drink mostly reds at home, not because I like them better per se, but they tend to be lower in residual sugar and I have to watch my blood sugar :) And they are supposedly better health-wise in general. I like wines of all kinds though. Usually not the really sweet ones, but once in awhile I can go for that. I have also learned that you don't have to spend a lot on a bottle of wine to get a good one. God bless the Total Wine store. :)  

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1 hour ago, widower2 said:

Slightly diff topic...wine. Any fans? Any particular type you like or not?

Well, yes.  I grew up in the Bay Area with Napa and Sonoma not all that far away.  John and I moved to the Central Coast where we have the ever-expanding Central Coast AVA with several sub appellations.  Our closest is Edna Valley, where John and I have friends who own a small, award-winning family winery.  We met them on a camping weekend with friends even before we moved down here.  At that time, they had a hand lettered sign and the "tasting room" was two card tables in part of a small warehouse.

My dad was a wine drinker and usually had one glass with dinner.  He and my mom bought two bottles of an excellent and expensive Cabernet Sauvignon from my birth year and then my dad stored it properly until my 21st birthday.  It was amazing, velvety and rich.  Our best friends did that for their two children.  We were part of the "help us choose a wine to age" friend group.  We did blind tastings of wines that were incredible when young and that held up for those 21st birthday parties.

Discussing types of wine I like would take quite a bit of time, so I'll summarize.  I don't drink more than a glass in an evening or two if I'm with friends or family for special occasions.

Reds:  Pinot Noir has always been a favorite because it can be made in so many styles.  Second, Zinfandel for it's spicy fruit.  I've been loving Syrah and Grenache (as well as GSM) the past decade or so in part because the grapes grow so well in our region.  I enjoy Viejo, Nebbiolo, and other varietals less well known in the US, especially when they're from countries or regions I don't know well.  Last summer, I had a number of carbonic red wines. Yum.

Whites:  Dry Alsatian whites cannot be beat, both from Alsace and US domestically grown.  I do not like sweet wines.  I am a fan of lemony-grassy Sauvignon Blanc.  I enjoy Pinot Blanc, Pinot Gris, and Chardonnay (if it's not overly buttery and/or overly oaked), and won't say no to Viognier, Chenin Blanc, or Semillon, but the same caveats apply:  Dry and made well.  I'd rather drink a little good wine.  Vino Verde or Malvasia Bianca are nice for a summer day and are usually inexpensive to boot.  As with reds, I like trying varietals I don't know.  For sparkling wines, any well made Brut, French Champagne or otherwise, but recently had my first Pet Nat.  That was a nice, lower alcohol, easy bubbly.

There are several additional varietals of both red and white that I have from time to time, but those I listed are my "go to."

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11 minutes ago, foreverhis said:

Discussing types of wine I like would take quite a bit of time, so I'll summarize.  I don't drink more than a glass in an evening or two if I'm with friends or family for special occasions.

So if you're alone you go nuts? ;)  

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Whites:  Dry Alsatian whites cannot be beat, both from Alsace and US domestically grown.

Wow I can't believe you said that...the only time I was overseas and my beloved come over to visit, we went to the Alsace region and loved the wine. It's a sentimental fav now.

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I do not like sweet wines.

I don't usually either, but I'm not dead-set against them. I really hate "dessert" wines, but once in awhile I don't mind a sweeter wine in that way, like  Riesling. 

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Chardonnay (if it's not overly buttery and/or overly oaked)

Funny, I don't like Chards but can get into one if it's buttery. I hate the oaked thing though. 

Quote

 

I'd rather drink a little good wine. 

I like trying varietals I don't know. 

 

Amen to both thoughts! 

There are some wines more that seem more common to VA that I really like, like Chambourcin, Viognier, and Norton.  

 

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45 minutes ago, widower2 said:

So if you're alone you go nuts?

😄I'm afraid not, though I can't say I wasn't tempted during the first year after I lost John.  I was determined not to become known as "the drunk widow who lives down the street."

48 minutes ago, widower2 said:

we went to the Alsace region and loved the wine. It's a sentimental fav now.

My father's side of the family is from Alsace, but I've never been there.  Love the wines though!

50 minutes ago, widower2 said:

Funny, I don't like Chards but can get into one if it's buttery. I hate the oaked thing though. 

A little buttery and a little bit of oak aging is fine with me.  It's the heavy style that became popular in the '90s that I dislike immensely. 

52 minutes ago, widower2 said:

I don't mind a sweeter wine in that way, like  Riesling. 

Just to make sure.  You mean a Riesling that's been made in a sweeter style?  I'm a huge fan of very dry Gewurztraminer and Riesling.  Once in a while a sweeter or dessert style Riesling, Gewurztraminer, or even Muscat is okay, say as a small sip with fresh summer peaches.

57 minutes ago, widower2 said:

There are some wines more that seem more common to VA that I really like, like Chambourcin, Viognier, and Norton.  

I'm not familiar with Norton, but Chambourcin sounds slightly familiar.  A dry, but balanced, Viognier is a real treat.

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1 hour ago, foreverhis said:

😄I'm afraid not, though I can't say I wasn't tempted during the first year after I lost John.  I was determined not to become known as "the drunk widow who lives down the street."

Props to that. I'm afraid I can't say the same...trying to work it though!

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My father's side of the family is from Alsace, but I've never been there.  Love the wines though!

Nice! You should go some time.

Quote

Just to make sure.  You mean a Riesling that's been made in a sweeter style?  I'm a huge fan of very dry Gewurztraminer and Riesling.  Once in a while a sweeter or dessert style Riesling, Gewurztraminer, or even Muscat is okay, say as a small sip with fresh summer peaches.

Yes. Generally  I think Gewurztraminer and Rieslings are sweeter, although there are dryer styles. tbh I've never known a "very dry" variety of either though.

Quote

I'm not familiar with Norton, but Chambourcin sounds slightly familiar.  A dry, but balanced, Viognier is a real treat.

You should check them out if available. Norton I think is almost exclusive to VA. 

 

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6 hours ago, Sparky1 said:

The Pecorino cheese gives it a kick because it is a strong tasting cheese. 

Yes Sparky for me too!

 

5 hours ago, foreverhis said:

I'm no longer up to using a mortar and pestle

No one does it in these days, execpt my friend's of Genova mom👌

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